Radon Testing

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What Is Radon And Who Should Be Concerned About It?

No matter where you are in America, your home may be exposed to dangerous radon gas. Radon is a natural, radioactive gas which is produced when uranium in the Earth’s crust decays, and turns into radium. Outdoors, radon will naturally dissipate harmlessly into the atmosphere as it rises through the crust. But in homes, it can become trapped, which is dangerous for the health of you and your family. Radon is colorless and odorless, and it is extremely carcinogenic. According to the EPA, radon is one of the leading contributors to the development of lung cancer, second only to smoking. For this reason, regular radon testing is key whether you’re a homeowner, or you’re interested in purchasing a home.

What Is A Radon Test, And How Does It Work?

Radon testing is the only way to determine if your home has higher-than-average levels of radon, which can pose a health risk to you and your family. There are short term and long term DIY testing kits that can be left in place, undisturbed, and will take 30 – 90 days. Upon completion of a DIY radon testing kit, you can send the samples to a lab for measured results. However, hiring a qualified professional will certainly provide optimal results as a Qualified Radon Specialist will use high tech equipment to produce results within 48 hours along with your report. A qualified radon professional will be available to interpret the radon levels, answer your questions and provide options for mitigation if necessary.

Why Are Radon Tests Important?

The biggest benefit of radon testing is peace of mind. Radon has no smell, taste, or color, and beyond contributing to the development of lung cancer, radon exposure has no symptoms that can be identified by a doctor. That means a radon test is the only way to make sure your home has a safe level of radon.

Radon tests can also save you money if you’re trying to sell your home, because you can provide information about radon levels to potential buyers, ensuring you meet local codes related to radon compliance. The EPA also recommends that you test for radon when buying a home. That way, if high levels of radon are detected, you can request that the home seller install mitigation features, or you can back out of the purchase by utilizing your home inspection contingency.

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